“Nobody realises that some people expend tremendous energy merely to be normal.” Swap “be normal” for “adapt to the new normality” and all of us can relate to this quote by the famous French-Algerian writer, Albert Camus, author of the no less famous novel The Plague (which is also rather apt for present times). Indeed, these days, living a ‘normal life’ seems harder than ever.
One of the fastest, most significant and sometimes most forced adaptations has been that of the banking industry, a subject that we’ve often covered on this page and will continue to in the future. Today, we want to touch on a brief but important report produced by the consultancy firm Capita, with a title that barely needs any explanation: Banking in the New Normal.
It might seem patently obvious, but the first and most immediate impact of the pandemic on the banking industry has been the restriction of movement. With varying degrees of confinement and other restrictive measures put in place to protect both ourselves and our loved ones, everybody has been affected, from employees working in investments, transactions and support roles, to customers, intermediaries and service providers.
Despite the fact that we’ve been talking about the digitalisation of banking services for decades, it’s only now that there has been an urgent need to accelerate this transformation if banks want to stay relevant. But this isn’t unique to the banking sector; many other industries are facing this very same challenge.
What is more specific to the banking industry is the impact of restrictions on banks’ core business. In ‘Year 1’ of the COVID era, banks are truly being called to respond to the crisis on multiple fronts. Not only do they have to deal with the growing vulnerability of customers, but they are also obliged to stay proactive in identifying challenges and offer the most personalised solutions possible. They also need to achieve this whilst providing maximum security against the inherent threats involved in “remote working” (which in reality is simply, “working from home”). Because the banking industry isn’t just any sector; it’s very tempting for those who are prepared to try and get an illegal advantage using technology, and in the banking industry, mistakes are paid for and paid for dearly.
As much as this might already be an underlying trend, the report points out that a number of transformation programmes implemented in the last decade have “failed to improve efficiency ratios sufficiently” to the point that an increase in mergers and acquisitions was not just to be reasonably expected but inevitable. Some voices have even suggested that this pandemic is another banking crisis in the making. However, there are other equally if not more important voices that are urging banks to underline their role as “financial champions” in this critical “moment of truth” for the industry.
The Capita report, which focuses on the UK but has valid points for all of the world’s major economies, calls on leaders in the sector to consider at least four key things:
  • Branches and cash machines – Branches should be considered an essential service, and any temporary or permanent closures should depend on the flow of customers. Regarding cash machines, there’s no excuse for not ensuring that they always have sufficient cash.
  • Customer service – With staff likely to fall sick, banking organisations need to have planned for remote working so as to continue to attend to customers. Robot process automation and artificial intelligence should become important means of providing new solutions.
  • Financial risk management – As mentioned above, the new focus for banks goes beyond identifying risks and blocking the selling of services to suspicious parties. Now, it’s about identifying and anticipating vulnerabilities and proposing imaginative win-win solutions.
  • Compliance – As if all this weren’t enough before, the outbreak of the pandemic coincided with the approval of the strictest privacy and data protection regulations yet. Some regulatory organisations have been prepared to provide deadline extensions for their implementation, but this won’t last forever. It’s precisely because banking activity will become increasingly more remote that regulatory compliance is demanded not just by public authorities, but also increasingly by the market itself.
“When this is all over and Covid-19 is but a distant memory, things will not necessarily go back to normal”, the report warns. “People may no longer be willing to be deskbound in a large office, miles from home for 35 or 40 hours a week.”
Ultimately, it might be that these “great efforts” are currently going unnoticed, the study concludes, “but if banks can learn from this crisis and finally make the strategic digital changes they have been considering for years, the future is potentially very bright” for the financial services sector.

Latest Articles

Press Release

Madrid, 8th Oct 2020

The use of new technology is a key part of risk management so as to make effective decisions and implement personalised solutions
GDS Modellica provides decision and analytical software for managing the entire credit risk management cycle whilst combating fraud with a unique interface which provides a complete view of the customer
The current world of finance is marked by technological change, where banks need to respond digitally as well as have a physical presence. Faced with the demands of a new generation of consumers, financial corporations have the opportunity to expand a niche in the market by guaranteeing round-the-clock access to banking services.
Digital Banking is here to stay. It offers convenience, speed, a wider range of better services, payment security, transaction management tools and access from different devices. It has been able to adapt to new customer habits and adopt new working methods to offer exclusive services which drive and encourage competition. Furthermore, thanks to process automation, digital banking can provide a better customer experience through personalised products and services, all the while focusing on the most important person, the customer. Digital financial transactions have multiplied exponentially and, with this, so have the risks. Because of the constraints on time, the volume of transactions and the associated risks, having physical bank branches alone is no longer a viable option. Instead, developments in software and the use of new technologies have made it possible to manage this increased risk in a precise and agile way whilst providing the customer with an effective, personalised service.
Far from being disruptive for the financial sector, the COVID-19 pandemic has been a catalyst for investment in digitalisation. In fact, it has led to an unparalleled surge in investment as companies aim to be more competitive by providing an improved, more personalised customer service, adjusting products and services to address demand and anticipating their needs. “We have moved from simple words to actions, from just talking about digitalisation to making it a clear part of every organisation’s strategic plans”, claims the managing director of GDS Modellica, Antonio García Rouco.
Digital Banking services represent an opportunity to broaden this niche in the market by developing virtual channels and services focused on the customer. Conscious of the new needs of the sector, GDS Modellica has developed flexible solutions to help finance companies create, manage and improve strategies in a quicker, more convenient and more personalised way. They’re able to do this whilst maintaining compliance within a strict regulatory environment and helping to accelerate the sales cycle, adapting it to both the supply of loans and loan proposals, all with maximum levels of security and agile, effective decisions following risk management analysis.
GDS Modellica covers the entire risk management cycle, from acceptance, customer management, fraud, collection and finally to regulation. Focusing on the four key elements of data analysis, consulting, tools and data management, they are able to provide expert advice and specific solutions to help businesses manage risk, with an interface that provides a complete view of the customer.
GDS Modellica’s decision management process is applied to multiple products, using the relevant variables to perform calculations and simulate models to arrive at safe decisions. The bank itself designs its risk strategy and then implements these decision-making solutions using their internal tools and architecture.
Transforming stored data into real knowledge and using it to provide each customer with a unique experience is key for being more competitive, making risk-free decisions and achieving business success.

Latest Articles

In the interview on the program “Desayunos Capital” on Radio Intereconomía, Antonio García Rouco emphasized the arrival of conversational banking. Intelligent conversational banking allows the creation of a close relationship with clients and the identification of their needs through algorithms that can reach the emotions or feelings of the users, with the aim of offering them customized services. These conversational banking functions are aimed at the end user in search of interaction between customers and financial institutions, through AI, in a natural way.
“In Spain, we are ahead compared to neighboring countries in this type of technology, where the main players in the sector have been doing so for years (although the Anglo-Saxon countries are ahead). In fact, we have banks that only and exclusively operate via mobile phones”, explained the General Manager of GDS Modellica.
García Rouco concluded that, in this type of service, security is a key point for financial services, and that banks take it very seriously as a result of the legislation in force and the application of intra-Community laws such as the PSD2.

Latest Articles

As we have looked previously, the technological advances made in recent decades have had a significant impact on the financial system and will continue to do so into the future. As a result, the financial sector has had to adapt to this “new era” where data is everything. In the context of banking, “data” means any and all information relating to credit cards, balances, accounts, account types or anything else relating to customer finances. This has led to the emergence of apps and platforms that synchronise all this information, allowing users and banking organisations to develop an ever-closer relationship.
According to Antonio García Rouco, managing director of GDS Modellica, Digital Banking “makes it possible to offer users a high-quality, personalised service to increase their confidence in organisations and satisfy customer demands for mobility, speed and personalisation”. By using apps, today we can process and evaluate data that allows us to find out customers’ real needs. Then, we can offer them services or information about productions or services that might interest them depending on their circumstances.
It’s a complete win-win: better use of time for the user and a greater chance of cross-sales for the bank.
Financial Technology has benefited from innovations such as Advanced Analytics, Artificial Intelligence, Cognitive Services, the Internet of Things and Blockchain to provide services to a new user profile, one which is more and more used to digital transactions and visits a physical branch much less. The ten benefits of financial technology for users are shown in the accompanying infographic.

Latest Articles

Press Release

Madrid, Sep 14th 2020

Digital banking offers users a high-quality, efficient, personalised service that leads to greater confidence in the organisation
Applications serve as a source of data to find out customers’ true needs and provide information about products or services that might interest them according to their situation
The technological advances of recent decades haven’t passed by the financial sector, which has had to adapt to this new era. It’s an era where data is key, whether it relates to credit cards, statements, accounts, account types or anything else that makes up customer finances. In turn, this has led to the emergence of apps and platforms to synchronise this data and better facilitate the bank-user relationship.
Digital Banking, claims Antonio García Rouco, managing director of GDS Modellica, “makes it possible to offer the user a personalised, high-quality service to increase their confidence in the organisation and satisfy the customer’s demands for mobility, speed and personalisation”. According to García Rouco, “Applications process and evaluate all types of data and make it possible to find out customers’ true needs and offer them services and information about products or services that might interest them according to their situation. This allows the user to use their time more efficiently and increases the chance of cross-sales for the bank”.
Financial Technology has benefitted from innovations in Advanced Analytics, Artificial Intelligence, Cognitive Services, the Internet of Things and Blockchain to better cater for a new user profile which is increasingly used to making online transactions and visits physical branches much less often. Below are ten key benefits for users that this financial technology brings:
  • No more waiting: digital banks are available 24 hours per day, seven days a week, 365 days a year.
  • More product information: users can more easily find information about payment methods, transaction amounts and useful information such as financial education topics and types of interest. All of this helps customers feel closer to the bank and better attended to.
  • Increased user confidence: electronic banking has the tools, protocols and levels of security that make searches and transactions safe and secure. These protocols range from security certificates to strengthened data encryption.
  • Increased transparency in services: the cost of services has improved, with even some commissions at zero cost or free transfers according to the needs of users.
  • Transactions are made completely secure through the use of complex encryption methods with coordinates, tokens and electronic IDs to stop hackers.
  • Intuitive, user-friendly platforms: something which users value highly. With users increasingly using multiple devices, companies are obliged to offer responsive designs that adapt to different configurations and screen sizes, as well as synchronising data so that it can be accessed at any time regardless of which device the customer is using.
  • Access to transactions: users have access at all times to their balances, pending transactions and other notifications depending on the available technology.
  • – No more branch visits: these are now confined to history. Users can use online banking and manage their transactions at any time, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.
  • High levels of user satisfaction despite not being widely used: according to a customer satisfaction report by ASFI (the Spanish financial supervision authority), more than 80% of users rate these tools higher than 8 out of 10, meaning that users find them very useful.
  • Ability to personalise interfaces: making it easy to configure designs with personalised menus for accessing preferred functions.
There is no doubt that Digital Banking has completely transformed the relationship between customers and banking organisations. Its success partly lies in the high degree of concentration in the financial services market which pushes the younger population to seek other alternatives for their financial services, alternatives that focus on an improved user experience where simplicity is key. But it also partly lies in the potential to offer financial services not just in the country where the financial licence is awarded but also in the other countries that make up the European single market, where the European Central Bank plays a key role.

Latest Articles

It is estimated that there are more than two and a half million applications available for Android devices via the Google Play Store. It is also estimated that a lower but still considerable number of nearly two million apps are available on the App Store for Apple devices. Apps now form an increasingly important part of our daily lives.

These days, we install, use and interact with mobile apps as naturally as eating, sleeping or breathing, and it’s hard to find a part of our daily lives that there isn’t an app for. Whilst financial apps are hardly new on the market, their use has grown exponentially since the beginning of the pandemic and the resulting confinement measures.
With people staying at home, working from home and adopting social distancing measures, a large percentage of the population has been pulled out of their comfort zone, where the majority of users limited their banking operations to the cash machine or branch offices as they tried to keep their household budgets in order.
The COVID-19 pandemic has turned this completely on its head and changed priorities. Where digital and mobile banking was once seen as convenient for banks, today it has become increasingly convenient for the customer, who can not only manage transactions more easily and efficiently but also choose from a whole range of neobanks and affiliated companies for better control of their finances.
The apps were already there; they just needed a stimulus to take off. And despite all the negative consequences, a stimulus was there. Today, we present a new infographic to show the extent to which consumers are opting for these new ways of banking, with data taken from a recent customer survey in the United Kingdom which has valid conclusions for other markets.

Apps are now taking control of savings and the management of personal assets.

Latest Articles

PRESS RELEASE

Madrid, 18th August 2020

The incorporation of digital technology and artificial intelligence in the world of finance has led to the emergence of neobanks, online banks that offer more transparent, cheaper and more personalised services
GDS Modellica has developed flexible solutions that allow financial companies to create, manage and improve their strategies in a faster, more convenient way that best suits their needs.
The incorporation of digital technology and artificial intelligence in the world of finance has driven a genuine banking revolution, leading to the emergence of a new direct form of banking, known as virtual banking, online banking, digital banking or, more commonly, neobanks. Neobanks are financial service providers that operate 100% online and customers can only access them using mobile apps or online platforms. Their completely digital services and applications are simple, intuitive and agile. All you have is a simple mobile app, an online account and a debit or pre-payment card, although some also offer third-party services like loans.
According to Antonio García Rouco, managing director at GDS Modellica, neobanks offer simple, modern, transparent products with greatly reduced commissions, something which is very attractive for users who are tired of traditional banks. They also offer very useful services like multi-currency accounts, cheaper international transfers and travel benefits. By combining finance and technology, these new fintech organisations are seeing a lot of success in the banking sector, affirms García Rouco.bancario”.
The success of neobanks and fintech banks, with their millions of customers, lies in their personalised customer service, more transparent services, reduced costs, the absence of mandatory linking and the option of combining currencies to make cheaper international transfers. They also allow customers to withdraw cash in any country in the world with no extra charges whilst providing them with information and security measures based on advanced biometric recognition techniques and maximum privacy in real time.
The origins of these neobanks can be highly varied. Some have emerged under the protection of existing financial or banking organisations, being able to rely on their economic support and expertise from day one. Others have been created from scratch, facing greater challenges due to the complexity of the task at hand and the need to amass a large amount of money or even find an online commercial organisation to support them.
Many neobanks don’t have a banking licence. Instead, they operate as e-money institutions (EMI) or as private companies offering their services through an external EMI that safeguards the customers’ money and guarantees its security. This licence allows companies to issue or manage electronic money, offering accounts, cards, transfers or debts to their customers. One of the main differences between companies that use an EMI licence and those that don’t is that companies with an EMI licence can issue their own cards. Current regulations state that EMIs must safeguard their customers’ money either using safeguarding accounts or insurance policies. They also need to have the right equipment and a minimum amount of capital.
Being fully aware of the new needs of the sector, GDS Modellica has developed flexible solutions that allow financial companies to create, manage and improve their strategies in a faster, more convenient way that best suits their needs. But furthermore, they’re able to do this whilst providing maximum security, helping companies to ensure compliance within a very strict regulatory environment and accelerate the commercial cycle by adapting it to both the supply of credit and loan proposals.

Latest Articles

Smart Conversational Banking: the near future of the banking industry
This year has brought many changes to our lives, whether it be how we shop, how we interact with other people or the absence of sporting competitions. But what changes has it brought to the world of banking?
Have you ever been talking to someone about a product that you’re thinking about buying only to later see offers for the same product all over social media? It’s happened to almost all of us, and understandably, it causes some people more than a little concern. It’s just one part of the artificial intelligence systems being using the modern world.
As part of this, technology company GDS Modellica has been developing a system that aims to help banks generate digital conversations with their customers. It all starts with artificial intelligence, using algorithms that will even be able to understand customers’ emotions or feelings.
Managing director for GDS Modellica for Europe and Latin America, Antonio García Rouco, explains, “Conversational banking aims to use algorithms to make it possible for banks to provide virtual financial advisors and replicate familiar environments for customers, where they can use natural language instead of interacting using menus”.
He also gave a specific example of what impact this will have on people’s lives with respect to their relationship with finance companies.
“Let’s imagine that I’m a customer who wants to buy a house and I have made some comments on social media. From there, the financial organisation gets in contact with the customer using algorithms that are capable of understanding natural language and thus can provide them with an offer based on what they are looking for.”
These days, there are many people dedicated to scamming customers, using techniques such as phishing, and this can be worrying for many people. But García Rouco provided reassurance and pointed out that both financial companies and technology firms have made big strides in creating the right conditions so that customers feel safe and secure.
What will this become a reality?
It’s still not clear exactly when this system will be fully implemented. What we do know is that it is already being developed and that some banks are already implementing it gradually.
García Rouco offered his own opinion on the matter, saying, “I believe that in the next five or six years, we will see huge advances with all of this, and just as with other things which initially seemed a bit like science-fiction, it’ll soon become a normal part of our everyday lives”.

Latest Articles

As we’ve already mentioned on previous occasions, the changes driving the world towards unprecedented levels of digitalisation were with us long before the coronavirus appeared. The COVID-19 pandemic isn’t responsible for the rise of online shopping, the popularity of online entertainment platforms or increasing numbers of people working from home. However, what the pandemic has done is to accelerate the incorporation of these things into our daily lives and prove that they’re viable alternatives to the old way of doing things.
The same can be said for the impact on banking and the financial sector. Online banking isn’t exactly a recent invention, but the outbreak of the pandemic and the change in behaviour brought about by confinement measures has allowed a scalability which was practically unthinkable just a year ago. Customers have seen previously limited functions expand and become more accessible. Meanwhile, banks and financial institutions have seen how digital tools can increase their impact, reach and capabilities, allowing them not just to gain more customers and build customer loyalty but also to explore new business channels and expand their presence within existing markets.
This effect is further amplified if we consider unstoppable trends like open banking, which have come out of this scenario even stronger. By encouraging the entry of new competitors and allowing third-party applications access to bank accounts, the digital acceleration caused by the pandemic has boosted innovation in a sector which was already showing signs of tiredness with the traditional model. And like all changes that happen naturally and organically, these will be lasting changes, even if they’re the result of something as abrupt as COVID-19.

None of this is just wild speculation. According to the World Economic Forum website, these observations have been reaffirmed by the 2020 edition of an annual investigation carried out by software consultants Tenemos and the Economist Intelligence Unit. In this global study on the future of banking, researchers drew conclusions based on interviews with more than 300 executives of retail banks, commercial banks and private banks, of which more than half are at C-suite level within their organisations.

The results of the 2020 investigation suggest which trends seem destined to shape the future of the banking industry, and they’re led by the systematic use of new technologies. In fact, two thirds of those surveyed claimed that new technologies will have the greatest impact on banking in the next five years. More important than the figure itself, what is noteworthy is that this represents a 57% increase from last year’s figure. The coronavirus pandemic has highlighted the possibilities that new technologies can provide for addressing customer demands, shifting external environments and the emergence of external competitors. They have moved from being a problem to being a useful ally.
One technology that leads the way in terms of adoption is Cloud and Software as a Service (SaaS), which has low infrastructure costs that allow banks to quickly create and change products. Almost 17 of every 20 executives believe that the cloud will be transformative in banking, to the extent that more than a quarter of those surveyed claim that it will be a principal focus for them for the next few years.
In fact, the Cloud and SaaS have allowed banks to operate in the same way as those who have always been considered their most embattled competitors, fintechs, who are instead increasingly revealing themselves to be strategic partners. “In just three weeks”, claims the study’s authors, “Atlantic Union Bank in the US used a cloud-based SaaS solution to fund over $1.4bn in Government Paycheck Protection Program loans for 6,500 businesses. EQ Bank – Canada’s first digitally-born bank – has used the scalability of Cloud to meet the surge in digital demand and recently reach $3 billion in deposits.”
But no map of new technologies would be complete these days if it didn’t include Artificial Intelligence (AI). If Cloud and SaaS are already safe bets, the decision of whether or not to adopt AI will be the difference between winners and losers. Over three quarters of those surveyed in this research (77%) claim that it will be the biggest game-changer in the banking industry.
This is because banks see a wide range of uses for AI. Many see great potential for improving customer experience through personalisation whilst others see uses for supporting new businesses or strengthening their portfolio management. Finally, since digital transformation is an end-to-end process, those surveyed are looking to implement AI in fraud detection and back-office functions in their future business plans. In fact, it has been the focus of technology investment 33% of executives globally, second only to cybersecurity, which really shouldn’t be a surprise in this sector.
Lastly, the study highlights that the digital transformation in banking goes beyond the mere application of technology when providing services. It also affects the business model itself. Almost half (45%) of respondents are “committed to transforming business models into digital ecosystems and making the bank the centre of these platforms”.
In keeping with this digital consolidation caused by the pandemic, simply providing services via the internet or mobile apps is no longer considered to be transformative. This is a change in the method of access, but the business models themselves have remained the same. However, the ecosystem model provides the opportunity to implement intuitive self-learning software which truly integrates banking into our everyday lives, moulded to suit each customers experiences, abilities and needs.
“The current environment is undoubtedly challenging for banks. The behavioural and economic effects of the coronavirus crisis will be profound and come on top of lingering financial, operational and consumer pressures”, conclude the study’s authors. “With these elements in place, banks will cut costs and drive efficiencies, helping them weather the coming storm and redefine their value to customers in a shifting market.”

Últimos Árticulos

Press release

Madrid, 17th June 2020
Digital Banking has to adapt to change regarding their customers, technology, threats and competition. A better customer experience translates into increased profitability.

The two sides of Digital Banking: a great opportunity to expand this financial niche but also many challenges that prevent it from becoming a truly universal way of banking.

Digital banking goes beyond just online or mobile banking platforms. It involves the complete digitalisation of all activities, programmes and functions. And it doesn’t just require the digitalisation of services and products, the front-end that customers see, but also the automated back-end processes and the middleware that connects them. The transition from traditional banking towards digital banking is marked by different rates of progress. This is a journey where new technologies like blockchain, big data, artificial intelligence, cognitive systems and the Internet of Things have driven the complete digital transformation of the finance world to improve the customer experience, create high-value digital services, guarantee sustainability and maximise efficiency and profitability. At the same time, mobile banking is starting to stand out and reveal itself as an opportunity for banks to generate more revenue through transactions.

The improved user experience that digital banking provides, both for customers and banks, in turn boosts profit. By making services available 24 hours a day, the number of customers increases, and, gradually, it will become the first choice for immediate business transactions where money needs to be in constant movement. It will also lead to increased online credits supported by precise mechanisms the gather and analyse data in order make market predictions, offer new business models and provide the customer with the best banking services. Banks need data to improve the customer experience but they also need to guarantee data privacy at the same time. This means that confidence is key. That’s why GDS Modellica has developed a specific risk management system for each industry which helps to focus the development and implementation of solutions for specific requirements.
According to managing director Antonio García, GDS Modellica’s new techniques using predictive analytics, big data and decision management “help the financial and banking sectors to resolve daily business problems and make the best possible decisions”. Their solutions take advantage of cloud computing to optimise flexibility, accelerate implementation and reduce costs. Their qualified services prove to be indispensable for any organisation looking to optimise and automate their credit risk management policies and strategies.
FinTechs and digital banking services represent an opportunity grow this current niche through digital transformation by developing virtual channels and services that are focused on the customer.
However, in reality, there aren’t just opportunities. The sector also faces a significant list of challenges and barriers that make it difficult to create a truly universal and accessible banking experience for everyone:
  1. Old inherited banking systems, language and platforms with a complex, antiquated architecture that require a profound transformation, an intelligent systems solution and central processes.
  2. Being able to offer customers the necessary information and options to make decisions. Treating the customer with respect.
  3. Opening appropriate service/assistance channels and consulting with the customer when designing products or offering new tools so that the consumer can take control of their decisions.
  4. The generational gap. Not all customers are familiar with mobile banking.
  5. Complete digital banking. Customers tend to be reserved about using a digital bank that has no physical branches; This makes complete digitalisation difficult.
  6. The emergence on the scene of competition from non-financial tech companies and institutions who have unfair advantages, given that they are more flexible and agile and don’t have the same obligations and rights.
  7. Internal barriers. The digital transformation is a complex process and requires specialists to implement it.
  8. Absolutely essential to attract or retain customers who want to be sure that their identity won’t be stolen, that fraudulent payments won’t be made from their accounts and that electronically signed banking contracts have the same legal validity as printed ones.
  9. Strict regulatory requirements, such as PSD2, which oblige organisations to protect themselves from cyberattacks in order to comply with their risk management obligations.
  10. Security: Banking security is about more than just preventing the spread of computer viruses. Banks need to protect themselves from cyberattacks and online fraud.
According to GDS Modellica, “the business models of financial organisations need to adapt to changes regarding their customers and the new environment where threats have become extremely advanced and attackers are capable of identifying the type of precautionary measures and get around them. Strategies in the financial sector revolve around four main themes: customer, technology, threats and competition”. In the digital era, the customer has more information, greater choice and a greater ability to make decisions; As a result, they are more demanding and want things done immediately and done well, and they have become the prime focus for financial organisations.

Latest Articles

Work with Us

Want to click less and know more?

Download GDS Modellica company overview
Icons made by geotatah from www.flaticon.com
Icons made by Freepik from www.flaticon.com
Icons made by Icongeek26 from www.flaticon.com
Icons made by monkik from www.flaticon.com
Icons made by monkik from www.flaticon.com
Icons made by Freepik from www.flaticon.com
Icons made by Kiranshastry from www.flaticon.com
Icons made by srip from www.flaticon.com
Icons made by Smashicons from www.flaticon.com
---------------------------------------------------- Vector de Diseño creado por fullvector - www.freepik.es Vector de Venta creado por macrovector - www.freepik.es Vector de Tecnología creado por macrovector - www.freepik.es Vector de Negocios creado por stories - www.freepik.es Vector de Tecnología creado por upklyak - www.freepik.es Foto de Negocios creado por Waewkidja - www.freepik.es Foto de Negocios creado por freepik - www.freepik.es Foto de Icono creado por freepik - www.freepik.es Foto de Negocios creado por freepik - www.freepik.es Vector de Personas creado por rawpixel.com - www.freepik.es Vector de Tecnología creado por upklyak - www.freepik.es Vector de Fondo creado por iconicbestiary - www.freepik.es Vector de Negocios creado por freepik - www.freepik.es Vector de Escuela creado por upklyak - www.freepik.es Vector de Escuela creado por upklyak - www.freepik.es Vector de Fondo creado por freepik - www.freepik.es Vector de Fondo creado por pikisuperstar - www.freepik.es Vector de Banner creado por fullvector - www.freepik.es Icons made by srip from www.flaticon.com Vector de Diseño creado por fullvector - www.freepik.es Vector de Banner creado por fullvector - www.freepik.es Vector de Tarjeta de visita creado por fullvector - www.freepik.es Vector de Tarjeta de visita creado por fullvector - www.freepik.es Vector de Banner creado por fullvector - www.freepik.es Vector de Infografía creado por katemangostar - www.freepik.es Vector de Logo creado por katemangostar - www.freepik.es Vector de Fondo creado por freepik - www.freepik.es Vector de Negocios creado por fullvector - www.freepik.es Vector de Negocios creado por freepik - www.freepik.es Vector de Ciencia creado por macrovector - www.freepik.es Vector de Negocios creado por pikisuperstar - www.freepik.es Vector de Infografía creado por fullvector - www.freepik.es Vector de Mercadeo creado por slidesgo - www.freepik.es Foto de Negocios creado por jannoon028 - www.freepik.es Foto de Fondo creado por freepik - www.freepik.es Vector de Flecha creado por macrovector - www.freepik.es iconixar from www.flaticon.com Icons made by Nhor Phai from www.flaticon.com Icons made by surang from www.flaticon.com Icons made by dDara from www.flaticon.com Icons made by mynamepong from www.flaticon.com Vector de Diseño creado por freepik - www.freepik.es Vector de Diseño creado por freepik - www.freepik.es Vector de Ilustración creado por stories - www.freepik.es Vector de Ilustración creado por stories - www.freepik.es Vector de Fondo creado por pikisuperstar - www.freepik.es Vector de Tecnología creado por upklyak - www.freepik.es Vector de Fondo creado por pikisuperstar - www.freepik.es Vector de Tecnología creado por upklyak - www.freepik.es Vector de Tecnología creado por stories - www.freepik.es/***********/ Vector de Infografía creado por fullvector - www.freepik.es Vector de Infografía creado por fullvector - www.freepik.es Iconos landing Icons made by srip from www.flaticon.com Icons made by Eucalyp from www.flaticon.com Icons made by Eucalyp from www.flaticon.com Icons made by Freepik from www.flaticon.com Icons made by dmitri13 from www.flaticon.com Icons made by Wichai.wi from www.flaticon.com Icons made by Eucalyp from www.flaticon.com Icons made by prettycons from www.flaticon.com Icons made by Smashicons from www.flaticon.com Vector de Fondo creado por pikisuperstar - www.freepik.es Vector de Tecnología creado por freepik - www.freepik.es Foto de Negocios creado por jannoon028 - www.freepik.es Vector de Tecnología creado por pch.vector - www.freepik.es Vector de Negocios creado por freepik - www.freepik.es Vector de Negocios creado por gstudioimagen - www.freepik.es Business card vector created by fullvector - www.freepik.com Card vector created by upklyak - www.freepik.com Business vector created by fullvector - www.freepik.com ----------------------------------------------------- Iconos sociales twitter negro
Icons made by Freepik from www.flaticon.com
linkedin
Icons made by Freepik from www.flaticon.com
youtube
Icons made by Freepik from www.flaticon.com
------------------------------------------------------
Icons made by Freepik from www.flaticon.com
Icons made by Wichai.wi from www.flaticon.com
Icons made by Smashicons from www.flaticon.com
Icons made by Eucalyp from www.flaticon.com
Icons made by prettycons from www.flaticon.com
Icons made by Smashicons from www.flaticon.com
Icons made by Freepik from www.flaticon.com